Humber Woodland of Remembrance

Humber Woodland of Remembrance

About Us

Humber Woodland of Remembrance offers green burials in the beautiful Herefordshire countryside, surrounded by wildflowers, trees and wonderful views. This beautiful site is run by Diane and Robert Thomas, together with their children Richard and Lizzie.

The family came to Risbury Court in 1985 on the retirement of Diane’s father, Albert Bemand, whose family have farmed at Risbury Court for over one hundred years. Farming has changed a great deal in that time, of course, but today we still farm a very similar mix of cereals, cider fruit, Hereford cattle and sheep, just as Diane’s great-grandfather, Richard Bemand, did in 1893.

We like to take a long-term view of our farming activities and this is possible because of the commitment of Richard and Lizzie to the future of the farm. All the family enjoy traditional farming activities, and Richard has been replanting and laying hedges over recent years. The iron-age hill-fort, Risbury Camp, has benefited from the pruning of the old cider orchard, which grows within its ramparts. This wonderful place is especially beautiful, when Robert’s pedigree Hereford cattle are grazing beneath the apple blossom in May.

About Humber Woodland of Remembrance

As with our farming, we see Humber Woodland of Remembrance as a long-term commitment. It is in a lovely position and the many trees, which we planted as landscaping, are growing in to a beautiful new wood, inhabited by rabbits, field mice, butterflies and many birds.

More trees and wildflowers are being planted as burials take place, and these are scattered randomly around the site, as families have chosen the exact spot where their loved one will be buried. This means that the woodland will develop in a very natural way, with a mixture of mature and young trees growing together. Wildflowers can be sourced from local supplier Plantwild, for more information visit www.plantwild.co.uk.

Care of the woodland is ongoing, and we mow around the graves during the summer months. Other areas of grass are left long, to encourage wild flowers to become established and to provide a habitat for butterflies and other invertebrates.

We aim for a balance between wildness and care and respect for bereaved families, but it should be remembered that Humber Woodland is a native woodland, not a park, and that any flowers planted there should be native wild flowers rather than garden plants.